research science

Dr. Peter Davies - Livestock Associated MRSA: What is the Appropriate Level of Concern?


Livestock Associated MRSA: What is the Appropriate Level of Concern? - Dr. Peter Davies, Professor, University of Minnesota, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Scott Brown - Challenges in Antibiotic Product Development in a Rapidly Changing Global Landscape


Challenges in Antibiotic Product Development in a Rapidly Changing Global Landscape - Dr. Scott Brown, Senior Director of Metabolism and Safety, Pfizer Animal Health, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Scott Hurd - Welcome and Purpose of Symposium


Welcome and Purpose of Symposium - Dr. Scott Hurd, Associate Professor, Iowa State University, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Robert Flamm - The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Health


The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Health - Dr. Robert Flamm, Director of Antimicrobial Development, JMI Laboratories, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Mike Apley - A Clinical Pharmacologist's View of the Interaction of Antimicrobials and Bacteria in Food Animals


A Clinical Pharmacologist's View of the Interaction of Antimicrobials and Bacteria in Food Animals - Dr. Mike Apley, Professor, Kansas State University, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Cow + Feed=Lots Of Gas


Cows are considered the largest producer of methane globally, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has reports stating "The livestock sector is a major player, responsible for 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions measured in [carbon dioxide] equivalent."

Reduction of methane produced by cows has long been thought to be a key green house gas reduction activity. Recently, Wageningen University researcher Van Zijderveld discovered that nitrate and sulphate additives in feed help reduce methane production in cow stomachs.

If their feed contains a small percentage of these substances the amount of this powerful greenhouse gas produced by sheep is halved, research by Sander van Zijderveld has shown.

While the research is in its early stages, there is potential to reduce methane production 16 to 30 percent.

BeefCast 0502 - Digging Deep Data Yields Productivity Improvement

BeefCast 0502 Show Notes:
  • K-State livestock specialist Justin Waggoner discusses a new analysis of twenty years of feedlot cattle performance data in the High Plains.

BeefCast 0493 - What does the Supreme Court decision on Roundup Ready Alfalfa mean?

BeefCast 0493 Show Notes:

Increasing artificial insemination pregnancy rates, part 2

Cow AI Pregnancy Rates, part 2 Transcript of Dr. Cliff Lamb, University of Florida, providing information on how you can increase your artificial insemination pregnancy rates in your cows, part 2.
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